Self-Rescuing Princess Society

No damsels in distress here.

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29

pbstv:

Zoe Saldana tells you why you should tune in tonight (9/29) to see her on the Hispanic Heritage Awards at 10/9c on PBS.

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29
pyranova:

Volume 2 kept saying Angelica was the most beautiful, but I’m sorry have you seen Alize?!
Anyway, I noticed none of the Ashe children resembled their father and were also suffering from same face (Devin a bit less so), so here’s my own take on Princess Alize.
Update: Princess Andrea

pyranova:

Volume 2 kept saying Angelica was the most beautiful, but I’m sorry have you seen Alize?!

Anyway, I noticed none of the Ashe children resembled their father and were also suffering from same face (Devin a bit less so), so here’s my own take on Princess Alize.

Update: Princess Andrea

(via princelesscomic)

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29
coolchicksfromhistory:

Josefa Joaquina Sánchez (1765-1813)
Art by Taneisha (tumblr)
Josefa and her husband José María España were involved in La Conspiración de Gual y España, the first attempt to establish Venezuela as an independent country.  During this period, Joesfa sewed the first Venezuelan flag.  She also transcribed documents for the revolutionaries.
Josefa, José María, and the other conspirators were unsuccessful in their attempts to overthrow Spanish colonialism.  José María was killed and Josefa was imprisoned for eight years.  Josefa was released from prison in 1808 and banished to Cumaná with her nine children.  Despite Josefa’s pleading, her children were denied the right to attend university.  Josefa died before Venezuela achieved independence.   

coolchicksfromhistory:

Josefa Joaquina Sánchez (1765-1813)

Art by Taneisha (tumblr)

Josefa and her husband José María España were involved in La Conspiración de Gual y España, the first attempt to establish Venezuela as an independent country.  During this period, Joesfa sewed the first Venezuelan flag.  She also transcribed documents for the revolutionaries.

Josefa, José María, and the other conspirators were unsuccessful in their attempts to overthrow Spanish colonialism.  José María was killed and Josefa was imprisoned for eight years.  Josefa was released from prison in 1808 and banished to Cumaná with her nine children.  Despite Josefa’s pleading, her children were denied the right to attend university.  Josefa died before Venezuela achieved independence.   

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29
aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.



This post was good but then it got better

aconnormanning:

maneth985:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

This post was good but then it got better

(via rejectedprincesses)

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29
dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

  • 29th September
    2014
  • 29
  • 27th September
    2014
  • 27
pretty-period:

"I’m glad that Shonda Rhimes saw me and said “Why not?” That’s what makes her a visionary. That’s what makes her iconic. I think that beauty is subjective. I’ve heard that statement [less classically beautiful] my entire life. Being a dark-skinned black woman, you heard it from the womb. And “classically not beautiful” is a fancy term for saying ugly. And denouncing you. And erasing you. Now … it worked when I was younger. It no longer works for me now. It’s about teaching a culture how to treat you. Because at the end of the day, you define you.”
PERIOD!
Viola Davis Photo Credit: Derek Blanks

Boom. 
And damn. She is fucking hot in HTGAWM (or however we’re abreviating it).

pretty-period:

"I’m glad that Shonda Rhimes saw me and said “Why not?” That’s what makes her a visionary. That’s what makes her iconic. I think that beauty is subjective. I’ve heard that statement [less classically beautiful] my entire life. Being a dark-skinned black woman, you heard it from the womb. And “classically not beautiful” is a fancy term for saying ugly. And denouncing you. And erasing you. Now … it worked when I was younger. It no longer works for me now. It’s about teaching a culture how to treat you. Because at the end of the day, you define you.”

PERIOD!

Viola Davis
Photo Credit: Derek Blanks

Boom.

And damn. She is fucking hot in HTGAWM (or however we’re abreviating it).

(via sxizzor)

  • 27th September
    2014
  • 27
  • 27th September
    2014
  • 27

Weekend Reading

Welcome to your weekend! Here are some great longreads for your reading pleasure!

image

Walter Isaacson has an informative historical piece about The Women of ENIAC

As ENIAC was being constructed at Penn in 1945, it was thought that it would perform a specific set of calculations over and over, such as determining a missile’s trajectory using different variables. But the end of the war meant that the machine was needed for many other types of calculations—sonic waves, weather patterns, and the explosive power of atom bombs—that would require it to be reprogrammed often.

This entailed switching around by hand ENIAC’s rat’s nest of cables and resetting its switches. At first the programming seemed to be a routine, perhaps even menial task, which may have been why it was relegated to women, who back then were not encouraged to become engineers. But what the women of ENIAC soon showed, and the men later came to understand, was that the programming of a computer could be just as significant as the design of its hardware.

image Mary Hudetz has a great interview with Sarah Deer in her She the People article ‘We’re not done’: MacArthur Fellow Sarah Deer finds justice for Native American victims of violence

“You know it seems like every few years, a sports figure, a celebrity, commits an act of domestic violence or child abuse, and there’s a big discussion that happens, but then it goes away,” she said.

She’s hopeful that this time the dialogue continues. In the meantime, she said, she finds it promising to see an ongoing conversation in Native circles. “I’m really grateful to see a discussion on social media, and among a lot of Native men in particular who are talking about the topic of domestic violence and holding each other accountable.”

imageSady Doyle’s piece Who Killed Adulthood is a great response to this article in The New Yorker accusing feminism of the deed

Now, I’ll admit: The day before I read Scott’s essay, I actually found myself crying because my life had contained so few of the rites of passage I’d once envisioned as constituting “adulthood.” I don’t have kids, or a retirement plan, or real estate. I didn’t foresee those ever being realistic possibilities. Like Peter Pan in reverse, I found myself cursing the fact that I couldn’t grow up. Which is to say, I think Scott’s largely right. Adulthood, particularly for people of my generation (“millennials,” if you can bring yourself to use that word; I’m at the older end of the curve) is dead, or at least on life support.

But the online sub-hed tells a different story: It advertises the piece as “charting the final, exhausted collapse of the adult white male.” Scott’s thesis is not just that behaving like a grown-up is increasingly outré, but that the era of stern, controlling, authoritative father-figures—the patriarchs who supposedly made up the patriarchy—is ending.
image

Harriet Minter has a fantastic piece in The Guardian about Nancy Honey, the photographer behind the 100 Leading Ladies exhibition, a piece highlighting some of the most successful women in the UK

As a country, the UK has a serious problem when it comes to highlighting senior women. There’s much discussion on how we encourage more women into senior roles, of whether we need quotas for the number of women on company boards and do women need to put themselves forward more. But what the media in particular is not good at is finding the women who are already there, who have made a name for themselves in their own sector but perhaps not outside of it. Maybe these women aren’t aware of the value they have?

Honey agrees, “I think all of the women are confident women but I think some of them don’t consider themselves to be someone who is leading their field. One woman kept saying, ‘Are you sure? Are you sure you want me?’. And I kept saying, ‘Yes, I’m sure,’ and her story is great and her picture is great and yes of course I wanted her.”
image

Elizabeth Weil has an in-depth piece on Sarah Marquis, The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles

On June 20, 2010, Marquis’s 38th birthday, she set out to walk from Siberia through Asia and, once back in Australia, trek to her beloved tree. The video of Marquis walking away from her starting point in Irkutsk feels like the setup for a horror film. “Hello, O.K., so here we are,” she said just before turning away from the camera. “Time to go now!” On her back is a 75-pound pack, and trailing behind her, overflowing with gear secured by bungee cords, is a custom-made cart that looks like a cross between a wheelbarrow and a giant roller bag — her dry-land sled. After Australia, Marquis couldn’t handle slaughtering more animals; she says it felt “like killing a friend.” So she decided to carry rice and hard biscuits (the latter inedible without “a nice, hot cup of tea”), which meant she would need to pull a cart. It now weighed 120 pounds.
  • 23rd September
    2014
  • 23