Self-Rescuing Princess Society

No damsels in distress here.

  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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La Jaguarina: Queen of the Sword (1859 or 1864-?)

rejectedprincesses:

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In April 1896, hardened military veteran US Sergeant Charles Walsh, in front of a crowd of 4,000 onlookers, turned tail and ran. Mere minutes earlier, during a round of equestrian fencing, he’d been hit so hard he’d been nearly knocked off his horse – so hard that his opponent’s sword was permanently bent backwards in a U shape. In response, Walsh did the honorable thing: jumped from his horse, claimed that the judge was cheating, and fled the scene, to the jeers of the massive crowd.

His opponent? A woman known as La Jaguarina, Queen of the Sword – an undefeated sword master who later retired only because she ran out of people to fight. Had she born 25 years later, according to the US Fencing Fall of Fame, she might be recognized as “the world’s first great woman fencer.” This week we tell the tale of this largely-forgotten heroine.

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My new favorite Tumblr!

  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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  • 19th September
    2014
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micdotcom:

Shonda Rhimes decimates NY Times critic who called her an “angry black woman” 

note to critics of the world: When you’re talking to African-American women, don’t use the tired “angry black woman” stereotype.

New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley, whose journalism career includes a laundry list of inaccuracies and errors, published a disgusting assessment of how Rhimes and her hit ABC series Scandal have changed the television landscape for black women. 

"When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography," Stanley begins, "it should be called How to Get Away With Being an Angry Black Woman."

Rhimes didn’t let it go unanswered Follow micdotcom

(via lifeworkfun)

  • 19th September
    2014
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Here’s your weekly list of great folks to follow!

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I’ve been following BlackGirlDangerous for a while now on Twitter and Facebook, and I love the no-holds-barred truth factory you’re always sure to find there. What started out as the brainchild of Mia McKenzie, has grown into a collection of writers for the blog, and an ever expanding reach to bring more voices of marginalized people into the fore. Please be sure to check out their Editor-In-Training Program and help them with their amazing work!

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I’ve been a fan of The Brain Scoop for a while, and follow them on all the social media networks. But I want to talk to you about Emily Graslie. Emily is the brain behind The Brain Scoop. Or, well… the Chief Curiosity Correspondent of The Field Museum in Chicago, which is basically the same thing. I love her YouTube channel, and hope she has time and energy to post there more! You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.

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I’ve done my share of cosplay, so I know exactly how much time, energy, blood, sweat, and tears go into pulling a costume together. So when I see Brichibi’s costumes I’m in complete awe. Follow her on Facebook, Tumblr ( brichibi ) and Twitter for all the latest photos and cosplay geekery.

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GlobalGirl Media trains teenaged girls in media to produce stories from their own perspectives. I love seeing these young women from around the world pursuing a story and bringing new awareness to the problems they face as well as to their own spirit and determination to overcome them. Follow them on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Vimeo, and YouTube.

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Darbin Orvar is a Girl in a Shop. I’m all for seeing more girls in science, but I also want to see more girls in woodshop! Her videos are fun and informative. You can follow her on Google+, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr ( darbinorvar ).