Self Rescuing Princess Society

No damsels in distress here.

  • 2nd September
    2014
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Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

  • 2nd September
    2014
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Lily Poulett-Harris (2 September 1873 – 15 August 1897)Lily Poulett-Harris was an Australian sportswoman and educationalist, notable for being the founder and captain of the first women’s cricket team in Australia. Poulett-Harris continued to play until forced to retire due to ill health from tuberculosis.As a young child Lily grew up in Hobart, where her father was the head of the Hobart Boys’ High School and a founder of the University of Tasmania. Lily was schooled by her father and received a Level II mark prize in December 1882. Lily was allowed to sit the major exams as a “trial of strength” in 1884 even though she was not eligible for a scholarship. She came second.The first indication of Lily’s strength of character comes from November 1885, when she was twelve years old. After spending the day at the beach with family friends and guests, her mother had found some brush where she feared there might be venomous snakes, and set a small fire to burn them out. The fire spread more quickly than she expected and caught her dress on fire. As she dropped to the ground and rolled around in the dirt she let out a cry for help. Lily came running, and had the presence of mind to pull off her wet bathing suit and wrap it around her mother’s body, preventing worse burns than those she received.Lily was fond of athletic exercises, and firmly believed that exercise was necessary for physical as well as the mental health. She enjoyed playing Cricket and was a good horsewoman and cyclist. One of her cricket teammates wrote, “Fear, it is said, was a thing unknown to her.”Lily’s cricket aspirations led her to found a cricket team for local woman, the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club, in 1894. This was, according to a contemporary news report, the first female cricket club in the Australian colonies. She was unanimously elected captain “and she was remarkably successful in piloting her team to many a victory.” By the December of the following year, the ladies’ competition had become well-established.Her sporting career is well-documented in the newspapers of the time. She was generally either the opening or third-order batswoman. The early sports journalism of the era consistently praised her performances. One wrote, “The feature of the match was undoubtedly the fine not out innings of Miss L. Poulett-Harris, captain of the winning team, who, going in first, carried her bat right through the innings for 64 runs.”In December 1894, Lily left Peppermint Bay to teach at her sister’s school in Hobart, the Ladies’ Grammar School and Kindergarten. Tragically, she contacted tuberculosis and died at the young age of 23. Although the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club no longer exists, today Australia has a thriving women’s cricket culture, including a national team. Inspired by the success of the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club and the southern Tasmanian competition, clubs were quickly formed in other parts of Tasmania, such as those at Swansea and Cranbrook on the east coast and Oatlands and York Plains in the midlands.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily_Poulett-Harris

Lily Poulett-Harris (2 September 1873 – 15 August 1897)

Lily Poulett-Harris was an Australian sportswoman and educationalist, notable for being the founder and captain of the first women’s cricket team in Australia. Poulett-Harris continued to play until forced to retire due to ill health from tuberculosis.

As a young child Lily grew up in Hobart, where her father was the head of the Hobart Boys’ High School and a founder of the University of Tasmania. Lily was schooled by her father and received a Level II mark prize in December 1882. Lily was allowed to sit the major exams as a “trial of strength” in 1884 even though she was not eligible for a scholarship. She came second.

The first indication of Lily’s strength of character comes from November 1885, when she was twelve years old. After spending the day at the beach with family friends and guests, her mother had found some brush where she feared there might be venomous snakes, and set a small fire to burn them out. The fire spread more quickly than she expected and caught her dress on fire. As she dropped to the ground and rolled around in the dirt she let out a cry for help. Lily came running, and had the presence of mind to pull off her wet bathing suit and wrap it around her mother’s body, preventing worse burns than those she received.

Lily was fond of athletic exercises, and firmly believed that exercise was necessary for physical as well as the mental health. She enjoyed playing Cricket and was a good horsewoman and cyclist. One of her cricket teammates wrote, “Fear, it is said, was a thing unknown to her.”

Lily’s cricket aspirations led her to found a cricket team for local woman, the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club, in 1894. This was, according to a contemporary news report, the first female cricket club in the Australian colonies. She was unanimously elected captain “and she was remarkably successful in piloting her team to many a victory.” By the December of the following year, the ladies’ competition had become well-established.

Her sporting career is well-documented in the newspapers of the time. She was generally either the opening or third-order batswoman. The early sports journalism of the era consistently praised her performances. One wrote, “The feature of the match was undoubtedly the fine not out innings of Miss L. Poulett-Harris, captain of the winning team, who, going in first, carried her bat right through the innings for 64 runs.”

In December 1894, Lily left Peppermint Bay to teach at her sister’s school in Hobart, the Ladies’ Grammar School and Kindergarten. Tragically, she contacted tuberculosis and died at the young age of 23.

Although the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club no longer exists, today Australia has a thriving women’s cricket culture, including a national team. Inspired by the success of the Oyster Cove Ladies’ Cricket Club and the southern Tasmanian competition, clubs were quickly formed in other parts of Tasmania, such as those at Swansea and Cranbrook on the east coast and Oatlands and York Plains in the midlands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily_Poulett-Harris

  • 2nd September
    2014
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  • 2nd September
    2014
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10 Reasons Why the NHL Should Commit to Women's Pro Hockey Before They Expand the Men's Game (Again).

  • 2nd September
    2014
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    2014
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    2014
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  • 2nd September
    2014
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Open letter - Spikes & Heels - Fitness For Badass Women | spikesandheels.com

Well I’m here to tell you to take your power back. Starting today, love your body. You are awesome and you are enough, just the way you are.

See, the game is rigged. They want us to hate ourselves. If we didn’t, a whole lot of industries would be out of business. They need us to constantly think we aren’t good enough, we need to improve, we just need a nip here, a tuck there, some eyeliner and a butt lift and all will be OK with the world. All those magic potions and creams are there to make us think we need to be ‘fixed’, that we aren’t OK.

You are enough.

Your body is wonderful.

Yes. This. So. Much. This.

  • 2nd September
    2014
  • 02
Cagney & Lacey: A Guide to Female Friendship

I loved this show so much! The characters were so real, complex, interesting. They made mistakes, fought, helped each other out, cried, and pretty much lived like real people do.

  • 2nd September
    2014
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